In chapter two, one of the main characters, Scotty, finds himself in the middle of the woods with just a canvas bag of supplies. He’s been left there, the sun is setting, and he’s absolutely sure there are bears all around him. Because he has no other option, he uses the tools in his bag to find his way to security and safety. Waiting there for him at the end is his mentor sitting back comfortably, awaiting his arrival.

Scotty’s mentor had given him everything he needed in that tote bag to be successful. But most importantly, he saw something in Scotty that Scotty did not see in himself. It was not until after he was pushed out of his comfort zone that Scotty was able to see his full potential.

I can relate so closely to this part of the book because I’ve had so many mentors in my life who have pushed me out of my comfort zone. They didn’t tell me what to do; they didn’t tell me the things I wanted to hear. They gave me the tools and the resources I need to be successful and then let me do it on my own. This is what it true mentor does.

In business and life, we have to take advantage of the opportunities we have to mentor and be mentored. We must constantly be looking for people who have more experience than we do and strive to learn from their mistakes. We must also always be looking for those who could use a little guidance to get to their next level.

This week, I have three challenges for you.

Number One: Pre-order your copy of Swim

Number Two: Reach out to someone who has been a mentor to you. Thank them for their wisdom, time, energy, and advise and tell them specifically what their contribution had on your life.

Number Three: Look for opportunities to mentor someone new in the game. Without being pushy, offer gentle advice, words of wisdom, or guidance to help someone make their next right step.